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Parent's Code of Conduct


Though your youngster is under the supervisory guidance of fine coaches during soccer practices and games, the most important people in their life are still you, their parents.  We'd like to pass on a few tips, which will make soccer more enjoyable for everyone involved.

  •   Just as you've earned your youngsters respect through your personal discipline and sense of responsibility at home, teach your child to respect the officials of the game and his or her teammates. You can best do this by not openly criticizing the decisions of officials, accepting them as part of the give-and-take of life. A child soon loses admiration for a coach or an official if his/her parents feel they  discriminate against him/her.

  • Remember the coaches and referees are volunteers. They give significant amounts of time so your child can develop and play. Treat them with respect even when you don't agree.

  • Come to the games with your youngster and encourage him/her and their teammates. It means a lot to a youngster when their parents are "out there" watching.

  • Applaud good effort by the players and let the coach point out the mistakes.

  • Since you do not condone loud or abusive language and gestures at home, do not tolerate such things during a game. Remember, a child imitates, sometimes without thinking. If you tolerate abusive language toward soccer officials, you may well form a child who abuses others later.

  • Never tolerate or laugh at an intentional bad play. If you do, you disrupt the discipline our coaches try to instill in the players.

  • Don't forget that a soccer game is a form of recreation and not a life and death struggle. Keep a rein on your emotions regardless of who wins or loses.

  • Do not criticize a player while on the field. Do you like to hear disparaging remarks about your child while you sit in the stands?

  • Your vote of confidence in the character and abilities of our coaches - even if you think you know more about running the team than our volunteers do - is also a vote of confidence in your youngster.

  • Provide transportation to and from all practices and games ensuring that the player is prompt not only in arriving but in his/her departure.

  • Allow your child to be a child.